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Millennial slang is perking up politics. Here's what aggro and troll mean . . .
Banksy Aggro Troll Image 2-page-001

*Featured Artist: @trishalyonsart

AGGRO.  It means a combination of aggravate, angry and aggressive. What do reporters mean when they say Trump or Cruz went aggro or aggroed one another? In MMORPG (massively-multiplayer online role-playing games like World of Warcraft) aggro refers to mobs, monsters or characters who attack you on sight without provocation.
Using aggro as a tactic to draw out an opponent or put an opponent on defense is no school yard bully’s trick. In game theory there are algorithms that determine who the mob, monster or character is going to attack and predict if the mob will bring friends to join in the attack. Trump and Cruz are not using algorithms for stump speeches. They are natural politicians, but millennials observing them are reminded of video games where aggro happens all the time.

TROLL.  Troll has nothing to do with fishing, Norse mythology or those cute little dolls from the 60s with the colored hair. In Millennial slang, troll refers to someone who uses an internet post to start an argument. Those mean people who leave hateful, crude remarks in the Comments section of a website don’t count as trolls. A troll is far more provocative, clever and sophisticated. Here’s where aggro and troll intersect. A troll posts a statement or observation online or via Twitter, Instagram or other social media with the intent of getting a rise out of someone and forcing them to respond. A troll’s goal is to upset someone to the point that they go aggro.
When a commentator accuses Trump of trolling or being a troll, it’s a compliment in the world of political science.

What is the best way to use Grammardog?
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Best practices include the following classroom use of Grammardog Teacher's Guides:  

  • As quizzes, tests and exams
  • As a diagnostic tool for grammar, style, spelling, capitalization and punctuation
  • As practice for state tests, AP tests, the ACT and SAT
  • As a review of grammar, style and proofreading
  • As an introduction to specific grammar elements, figurative language or literary devices
  • As a springboard for class discussion of an author’s style
  • As a tool for analyzing grammar and style in context
  • As ready-made lessons for teaching how to write literary analysis
  • As a tool to improve reading comprehension of challenging material such as Shakespeare plays, classic novels, essays and poetry
  • As an easy way to compare different authors’ styles
  • As a tool to get reluctant readers to engage the text in a book, short story, play, essay or poem

Grammardog Teacher's Guides use sentences from literature.  Titles include novels, short stories, plays, poems, essays, and non-fiction.  Each Grammardog Teacher's Guide includes more than 125 multiple choice questions, an Answer Key, a Glossary of Grammar Terms and/or a Glossary of Literary Terms.  Grammardog Teacher's Guides are classroom reproducible.  Teachers may photocopy Grammardog quizzes or project them electronically on a white board.  
Try GrammarUp - the online version!

Did You Know Grammardog is Global?
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Teachers in more than 20 countries use Grammardog.

Gotta Have Faith
Martin Luther King, Jr - gdog

“Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase.”
- Martin Luther King, Jr.

The LL Cool J Way
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“Do what you love; you’ll be better at it.  It sounds pretty simple,
but you’d be surprised how many people don’t get this one right away.”
- LL Cool J